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Should I Add Electricity To My Horse Fencing?

We have such a terrific staff here at MyHorse Daily—and one of them, editor Tiffany Mead, has some thoughts on horse fencing to share with you.

Enjoy the read,

Amy

electric fence

It’s time to fix up the fencing on our horse property. Our paddocks have always had smooth wire fences and it has worked really well for us. But without fail, every year when it is time for regular maintenance on our fences, my mom always considers adding electric fencing to our pastures. We’ve toyed with the idea of electric fencing before and tried to decide if electric fencing was going to work for our horse pastures. And as good an idea as that is, we never end up doing it.

So I decided to scour the internet for some useful articles about electric fencing for horses and found some really great information! I found these two that focus on electric horse fence options and they were beneficial for me. I hope they are for you, too!

This first article really helped us because it lays out the logistics of what you’ll need to install an electric horse fence. Also it explains how installing an electric horse fence is different than other fences and what style of electric fencing you should get. I like that it explains how important it is to test the fence. When we were new to horses and had just our first horse, we couldn’t figure out why the water level never really seemed to change from the water trough. We had not tested the water tank heater that kept his water de-iced in the winter, thinking that the barn electricity and heater were wired correctly. Well, sure enough, when I went to clean the water trough, I got shocked from the plug, and it turns out that he was being shocked whenever he went to get a drink of water. The same concept of checking a water heater to be sure it is grounded applies to checking electric fences: Ground AND check any electricity that is near animals or water.  http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch/fencing/electricfence_021005

After I read that article about choosing and installing an electric fence, I wondered what some of the do’s and don’ts of having an electric fences were? Well, our friends at EquiSearch have compiled a good list of what you should and shouldn’t do if you have an electric horse fence around your pasture. There are a few simple guidelines for electric fences that are pretty common-ense, like don’t plot the fence where your horse rolls;but I had never thought about not using a wire as the electrified portion of the fence. http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch/fencing/electric_fencing_081103

Check them out and tell me what you think!

-Tiffany Mead

 

P.S. – Check out our new FREE guide on fencing from MyHorse Daily, Fencing For your Horse.

Categories: Fencing.

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One Response

  1. An electric fence puts out high voltage, but with a low current
    pulse to not injure the animal. The fence line should be insulated
    from the ground so that there is no leakage, therefore a quality
    insulator is crucial. Horses will feel a shock when they touch
    the fence line but it won’t do any damage to the horses. As the horses
    get trained they will know not to go near the fence and it will act as a barrier.
    They will learn not to go near it.
    for more information on electric fence troubleshooting and resources visit:
    http://www.zarebasystems.com/resources/expert-tips

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