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Horse Rescue Report: Late-Winter Blues

As this one rider reflects, there are ways to enjoy your horse that don't involve riding.

Banjo has just enjoyed a nice mud bath.

Banjo has just enjoyed a nice mud bath.

Is the never-ending winter interfering with your horse life?

Horse rescue advocate Cate Lamm weighs in on the topic:

Here at the end of winter, with spring right around the corner, I’m getting the itch to ride.

Banjo, my rehabilitated rescue horse, starts shedding every January. I dream of giving him a cleansing bath, then riding into the warm sunshine on dry footing.
But here in Tennessee, the cold, rainy, snowy days are dragging on, and the mud will not go away.

When I lived in Colorado, I boarded Banjo at a place with a nice, warm, indoor arena. But as my work with the rescue horses increased, I moved Banjo to a facility closer to the rescue. There were huge pastures, but no indoor arena. This meant I had to come to terms with letting Mother Nature dictate my riding schedule.

I thought perhaps that as a side benefit to my move to the South, the winter weather would allow for more outdoor riding. However, I didn’t count on so much rain and mud. It’s such a contrast to Colorado’s dry climate.

But Mother Nature still holds my fate in her hands. Every morning, when I get up and boot up the computer, my first stop is the National Weather Service. I hold my breath and check the latest weather report.

Come on weather person, tell me what I want to hear! Give me some warm temperatures, maybe a little sunshine. I want to ride my horse today!

The meteorologist’s report can make me smile and rush around for my riding clothes—or make me sigh and grab my long johns and raincoat.

When I can’t ride, I use the time to groom Banjo or just hang out with him. I’ve found that it’s important to just spend time without expecting anything from him. Being together with no expectations fosters a different kind of friendship. You just enjoy each other’s company.

The rest of the year, we’re almost always carrying a saddle saying, “Let’s go!” to our horses.

As I wait for Mother Nature to give me that sunny day, I’m thankful for the quiet times spent just standing with my sweet horse.

A-Home-For-Every-HorseIf you want more information on rescue horses or you want to locate a rescue near you, please check out AHomeForEveryHorse.com. Equine.com and the Active Interest Media Equine Network have joined forces with the American Horse Council’s Unwanted Horse Coalition to launch A Home for Every Horse Project.

This project helps find homes for America’s 170,000 to 200,000 horses in need of care and shelter.
Here’s how it works:
• Begin the search for your next equine partner atAHomeForEveryHorse.com. You can search horses waiting for homes at nonprofit shelters across the country. Browse by rescue horse, or find rescue organizations in your area.

• Visit the site’s “Services” section to learn about your local rescue organizations. Find out how you can volunteer, donate, or simply spread the word.

• Look for upcoming stories on EquiSearch.com related to horse rescue.

If your 501(c)(3) rescue organization would like to join the Home For Every Horse Project, call (866) 467-7323, ext. 100. Equine.com is a part of Active Interest Media Equine Network.

Categories: Wild or Rescued Horses.

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