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Horse Rescue Report: Tough Decision

Opal teaching Cate about jumping. | Photo courtesy of Cate Lamm

Opal teaching Cate about jumping. | Photo courtesy of Cate Lamm

As I mentioned in my last blog, I was having a tough time affording both my horses. I planned on having one horse, but the second one, Opal, came in a spur-of-the-moment decision.

My Opal was a big, beautiful Percheron cross. She was a tough cookie outside and big softie inside. I loved her very much.

I struggled with what to do. I believe in keeping a horse forever when at all possible. But, as time went on, it was becoming less feasible for me to keep both horses.

As the winter was drawing to a close, I decided I’d have to let Opal go, but only to the perfect home. This meant she’d have to go to someone who’d love and care for her extremely well.

So, I began my search. It didn’t take long. I found the perfect situation for her right off the bat. A friendly woman and her teenage daughter were looking for a horse for light riding, but mostly to bond with and love. Opal would be perfect for this.

Opal’s new owner was very committed to keeping her forever. Still, I told her I’d always take Opal back, if she didn’t want her for any reason.

It was with a heavy heart that I said good-bye to my big gray girl. It was very hard.

When I delivered Opal to her new home, I buried my face in her soft, gray neck and cried. I told her I loved her and knew she’d be okay in her new life. She nuzzled my hand looking for treats and went to her hay. She did love her food.

I’m happy to say that Opal is still doing well. I get updates and photos from her owner. Opal lives a pretty easy life in a big pasture with two geldings that she bosses around.

I’m thankful for having Opal in my life. She taught me a lot. Mostly to stand tall and be who you are no matter what the consequences.

Cate Lamm, an avid horsewoman, has been a part of Colorado Horse Rescue (www.chr.org) for 10 years. There, she’s served as head of the adoption committee, has acted as general manager and now works as a rehabilitation trainer. Lamm has owned a number of her own rescue horses and has 20 years of equine experience. Based in Longmont, Colorado, she’s also the editorial assistant of The Trail Rider (www.trailridermag.com), sister publication of MyHorseDaily.com.

A-Home-For-Every-HorseIf you want more information on rescue horses or you want to locate a rescue near you, please check out AHomeForEveryHorse.com.

Equine.com and the Active Interest Media Equine Network have joined forces with the American Horse Council’s Unwanted Horse Coalition to launch A Home for Every Horse Project.

This project helps find homes for America’s 170,000 to 200,000 horses in need of care and shelter.
Here’s how it works:
• Begin the search for your next equine partner at AHomeForEveryHorse.com. You can search horses waiting for homes at nonprofit shelters across the country. Browse by rescue horse, or find rescue organizations in your area.
• Visit the site’s “Services” section to learn about your local rescue organizations. Find out how you can volunteer, donate, or simply spread the word.
• Look for upcoming stories on EquiSearch.com related to horse rescue.

Categories: Wild or Rescued Horses.

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